What To Do When A Child Is Having A Seizure?

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Child Seizure

In young children, a seizure, also known as a convulsion or fit can be caused by raised body temperature, linked to throat, ear or other infections. It can occur because the brain is not mature enough to deal with the body’s high temperature. When a child is having a seizure, you may find they have: Loss of or impaired response Vigorous shaking with clenched firsts and an arched back Signs of a fever, with hot flushed skin and sweating. Breath holding and red puffy face. Possible vomiting Or a loss of bowel or bladder control. If you think your child is having a seizure, place pillows or soft padding around the child so they don’t injure themselves on surrounding objects.

Do not restrain them. If they have a raised body temperature, try and cool the child by removing any bedding or clothing, although you may have to wait until the seizure stops until you can do this. Ensure there is fresh air but make sure that the child doesn’t get too cold. When the seizure has stopped, open the airway and check their breathing. If they are breathing, put the child in the recovery position, call 999 or 112 for emergency help. While you wait for help, reassure the child and monitor their level of response. So remember, place padding around the child and don’t restrain them. Try and cool them down. When the seizure has stopped, open their airway and check their breathing. If they are breathing, put them in the recovery position and call 999 or 112 for emergency help.

How To Treat Poisoning, Signs & Symptoms?

Swallowed poisons could include chemicals, drugs, plants, fungi and berries. There are five key signs to look for if someone has swallowed a poison. They may have nausea and vomiting, which can sometimes be blood-stained cramping abdominal pain. A burning sensation. They may show a decreased level of responsiveness or even have a seziure. If someone has swallowed a poison, and they are responsive, ask them: What have you swallowed? How much did you swallow and when did you swallow it? Look for clues, such as poisonous plants or empty packaging. Reassure them and call 999 or 112 for emergency help. Give ambulance control as much information as you can about the poison as it will help to treat the casualty.

While waiting for help, monitor their level of response and keep reassuring them. If the poison they’ve swallowed has burnt their lips or airway, give them sips of water or milk. If they should vomit, try to keep a sample in a bag or container to give to the ambulance personnel. It may help them to identify the poison. Do not try to make them vomit. If they become unresponsive at any time be prepared to treat an unresponsive casualty. So remember, when treating someone who has swallowed a poison ask them what they have swallowed, how much and at what time. Look for any clues. Call 999 or 112 for emergency help. While waiting for help reassure the casualty and monitor their level of response and that’s how you can help someone who has swallowed a poison.

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